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VOLUME 10 , ISSUE 3 ( Sep-Dec, 2017 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Sustainable Development Goals- Post-2015 End Tuberculosis Strategy

Mrs. Nandhini M, Prof. Dr. Karaline Karunagari

Keywords : Tuberculosis, Sustainable Development Goals and Tuberculosis strategy

Citation Information : M MN, Karunagari PD. Sustainable Development Goals- Post-2015 End Tuberculosis Strategy. 2017; 10 (3):31-34.

DOI: 10.5005/pjn-10-3-31

License: CC BY-NC 4.0

Published Online: 01-12-2017

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2017; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by bacteria (Mycobacterium tuberculosis) that most often affect the lungs. People infected with TB bacteria have a 10% lifetime risk of falling ill with TB. Tuberculosis (TB) is a top infectious disease killer worldwide. Over 95% of TB deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries, and it is among the top 5 causes of death for women aged 15 to 44.1 Transforming our world: the 2030 agenda for sustainable development. It outlines global impact targets to reduce TB deaths by 90% and to cut new cases by 80% between 2015 and 2030, and to ensure that no family is burdened with catastrophic costs due to TB. WHO has gone one step further and set a 2035 target of 95% reduction in deaths and a 90% decline in TB incidence - similar to current levels in low TB incidence countries today2. SDGs and End TB Strategy implementation will require very active engagement of all sectors and partners, from the highest level government officials to civil society. The ultimate goal of TB elimination requires that appropriate interventions are implemented everywhere and the underlying drivers are not only addressed, but sustainably addressed3.


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  1. WHO. Documentation for World Health Assembly 67.http://apps.who.int/gb/ebwha/pdf_files/WHA67/A67_11-en.pdf (accessed Sep 18, 2016).
  2. WHO. Global tuberculosis control: WHO report 2016 (WHO/HTM/TB/accessed sep 18, 2016.). Geneva: World Health Organization, 2016.
  3. Global TB Programme, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(15)60570-0 (accessed Sep 18, 2016)
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